Health Articles

  • Injuries are not scheduled and tend to occur when you least expect them. When you or your loved one suffers an injury, you want the best care available as soon as possible. In some cases, that means a trip to the emergency room.

  • Your ankle supports a force about five times your body weight when you walk. Normally, the cartilage in the ankle joint cushions the bones, so walking is painless, something we often take for granted.

  • The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It helps you walk, run, and jump. But when the tendon gets stretched too far, it can rupture, resulting in a complete or partial tear.

  • A hammertoe is a deformity of the second, third, or fourth toe. This condition causes a bend in the toe’s middle joint, which makes the toe resemble a hammer—hence the name.

  • Using a walking aid, such as crutches, is an important part of your recovery because it allows your foot or ankle to heal properly. Learning how to balance with your walking aid is one of the most crucial steps in using it effectively.

  • Maintaining a healthy weight and activity level keeps your muscles strong and can delay joint replacement. But how do you help your arthritis when it hurts to work out?

  • Bone, joint, and muscle specialists devote their practices to helping patients who experience joint problems.

  • The knee is a common place for osteoarthritis or the loss of cartilage in the joint. One option to correct this is a total knee replacement, which is an extensive, open procedure with an extended recovery time.

  • Sciatica is the result of a protruding or herniated disc in your spine. The out-of-place disc puts pressure on the nerves in your lower spine, resulting in mild to severe pain in the lower extremity.

  • Whiplash is a neck strain injury often associated with car accidents, but it can also occur in contact sports, such as football. The impact or blow causes the head to quickly jerk forward or backward, resulting in stretched or torn muscles and tendons in the neck.